Research University news

Our top 5 discoveries from the University in February

One month into the second semester, you may be beginning to think about assignments, dissertations and, research projects, but here at The University, there are plenty of weird and wonderful research discoveries happening on a daily basis.

Here’s some of our favourite research stories from The University of Manchester in February:

Healthy diet can ease symptoms of depression 

An analysis of 46,000 people has found that a healthy diet can reduce the symptoms of depression. Dr Joseph Firth, an Honorary Research fellow at Manchester says that, until now, research has been unable to definitively establish if dietary improvement could benefit mental health.

 Scientists research impact of oil rig spills on fish 

Dr Holly Shiels and PhD student Martins Ainerua are at the forefront of the fight to protect cold water fish from the effects of crude oil spills from offshore oil rigs. The researchers are working off the coast of Norway to understand how the oil impacts on hearts of cod and halibut.

Masterswitch discovered in body’s immune system

A Manchester academic has led a study which could make great strides in the treatment of autoimmune diseases including Cancer, Diabetes, Multiple Sclerosis and Crohn’s Disease within a few years. “These findings represent a significant step forward in the understanding of the immune system and we believe many people worldwide may benefit.” – Professor Graham Lord

Researchers develop flags that generate energy from wind and sun

Ever thought that windmills and solar panels could be combined as an energy generator? Maybe not, but UoM academics have created flags that can generate electrical energy using both wind and solar power! The novel wind and solar energy-harvesting flags have been developed using flexible piezoelectric strips and flexible photovoltaic cells.

Biggest ever map of human Alzheimer’s brain published 

A Manchester research has led an international team to an incredible development which is an important advance for scientists researching Alzheimer’s. The team produced a study of the differences between healthy brains and those with Alzheimer’s Disease and have developed the largest dataset of its type ever.